Legal Terms & Vocabulary Part-B

Bail:

Also called Bond. Money or property was given to the court for the temporary release of a defendant, to ensure that the defendant will return to court.

Bail Bondsperson:

A person who lends money to a defendant to pay for bail.

Bail Commissioner:

A state-appointed person may set the amount of bond for persons detained at a police station prior to arraignment in court and recommends to the court the amount of bond that should be set for the defendant on each criminal case.

Bar:

Refers to attorneys as a group.

Best Interest of the Child:

The standard a judge uses to decide custody and visitation issues

Bench Warrant:

Court papers issued by the judge, “from the bench,” for the arrest of a person.

Bond:

Also called bail. Money or property was given to the court for the temporary release of a defendant, to ensure that the defendant will return to court. There are two kinds of bonds:

a) non-surety bond, where the defendant’s signature alone guarantees the amount of bond and the defendant, is not required to post any property or retain the services of a professional bail bondsperson as collateral

b) Promise to appear Surety bond The court requires cash, real estate or a professional bail bond persons signature as collateral before releasing the defendant back into the community. (The court may allow the defendant to post ten per cent of the bond in cash to secure his or her release.)

Bond Forfeiture (calling the Bond):

If the defendant fails to appear in court as scheduled, the judge may order the bond forfeited (paid to the state) and the defendant rearrested.

Bond Review:

A hearing for a judge to decide if the defendant’s bond amount needs to be changed.

Bondsman:

A surety; is one who has put up cash or property as collateral before a defendant may be released

Brief:

A written document is prepared by a lawyer or party on each side of a dispute and filed with the court in support of their arguments.

Broken Down Irretrievably:

The most common reason for granting a divorce. It means there is no hope of the husband and wife getting back together again. Also known as “no-fault” divorce.

Share This Content

2 thoughts on “Legal Terms & Vocabulary Part-B”

Leave a Comment